GMAT Tips Sat 06 2016

GMAT Tips How to solve a complex verbal question?

Here is a difficult Sentence Corrections question:

 

While one must always be wary of investment opportunities, which promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that you risk losing some money than settling for meager returns.

(A) opportunities, which promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that you risk losing some money than settling for meager returns

(B) opportunities which promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that one risk losing some money than settle for meager returns

(C) opportunities that promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that one should risk losing some money than settle for meager returns

(D) opportunities, which promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that one risk losing some money than settle for meager returns

(E) opportunities that promise “get rich quick” returns, investment experts agree that it is more advisable that you risk losing some money than settle for meager returns

 

How should you tackle with it?

First step? As before, locate the main subject and main verb! It’s not too hard: “experts agree.” But then we should also identify the subordinate clause: “(while) one must be.” Then there are the two interloped subject/verb pairs: “(that) it is” and “that you risk.” Finally, there is a relative clause: “which promise.”

Whoop! Here, none of the errors in this sentence have to do with subject/verb agreement. Still, it was essential for us to separate out the various clauses of the sentence in order to have an idea of its different levels—and thereby make ourselves better able to see what matches up with what.

 

The pronoun “one” should not be changed to “you” in mid-sentence when referring to the same person, so (A) and (E) are unacceptable. The comma before the relative pronoun “which” suggests that the modifier is non-essential, which does not make much sense (not all investment opportunities “promise ‘get rich quick’ returns”), so (D) is out. (C) is faulty because of the use of “advisable that one should risk”--the mandative subjunctive does not allow for the use of modal verbs in any circumstances. (B) is correct.